Africa takes the global media spotlight again when President Barack Obama makes an overnight stop in Ghana this weekend on his way home from a trip that took him first to Russia, then to Italy for the annual summit of the Group of Eight industrial powers.

Arriving in Ghana on Friday, July 10, and departing Saturday, July 11, the stopover will be Mr. Obama’s first visit to sub-Saharan Africa as president of the United States. To mark the occasion, he will give a major speech at the Ghanaian parliament in Accra, the country’s capital, that essentially will outline his administration’s policy towards Africa in the years ahead.

The White House’s links for all Internet and new media content pertaining to the trip (including SMS, Twitter, Facebook and blogs) can be found at www.whitehouse.gov/mediaresources/.

The discussion of my book, Africa: Strictly Business—The Steady March to Prosperity, on Friday at 6:00 p.m. at Hue-Man Bookstore in Harlem will be an opportunity to examine President Obama’s agenda for Africa, Africa’s self-designed development and whether or not the African Diaspora is missing the chance to make a social and economic impact on the continent. Hue-Man Bookstore is located at 2319 Frederick Douglas Blvd., between 124th and 125th streets.

Why Ghana and not, say, Nigeria—sub-Saharan Africa’s oil giant; or Kenya, where Mr. Obama’s father was born? In a wide-ranging interview with Allafrica.com earlier this month, the president was unequivocal about the reasons for his choice. He cited the peaceful transfer of power in Ghana’s most recent elections, a clear commitment to the rule of law and good governance.

“There is a direct correlation between governance and prosperity,” Obama told Allafrica.com. “Countries that are governed well, that are stable, where the leadership recognizes that they are accountable to the people and that institutions are stronger than any one person have a track record of producing results for the people. And we want to highlight that.”