Lisa A. Bing

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President • Bing Consulting Group Inc. • Brooklyn, N.Y.

With more than 25 years of experience in education and organ-izational development, Lisa A. Bing has a reputation for enhancing the interaction of senior executives with their staff. “I’m a management consultant and executive coach who works with leaders to improve their performance and the productivity of their teams,” says Bing, president of Bing Consulting Group.

She gets most of her referrals by word of mouth, from interacting with students as an adjunct professor at New York University and from speaking engagements. Bing Consulting Group averages four to ten clients a year, among them Deutsche Bank, HSBC Bank USA, Prudential Financial, Verizon, Procter and Gamble and the City University of New York. Her approach is to help executives and business leaders understand the issue at hand and recognize the challenges and opportunities therein.

“It all gets wrapped up in communication—who says it, what the message is and how that message is delivered. One of my strengths and gifts is to help people to make some sense of safety as they step into the discomfort of change,” Bing says. The goal is to help people understand development and learning as a natural part of growth, and in so doing remove some of the discomfort of self-assessment and resistance to change, she explains.

In addition to membership in other trade organizations, Bing is a vice chair of the board for the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce and chair of its marketing and membership committees. She studied education, management and training development, and organizational psychology at Boston University, NYU and Columbia University’s Teacher’s College.

Bing stresses the importance of passion, of caring deeply about a subject. People should figure out what they are good at, get help early, and learn to cope with rejection by allowing it to “roll by,” she says. But you should never stop learning, she argues. “A person has to be willing to make a mistake. Find a way to step outside their comfort zone and be there long enough to experience something new,” she says.

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